Domestic Violence

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Education Program

The Education Program at Raphael House works to enact social change and prevent domestic violence by engaging our entire community in conversation and by encouraging people of all genders, ages and backgrounds to speak out against violence.

The primary activity of the Education Program is offering free trainings throughout our community. We present in local middle and high schools, to healthcare providers, business leaders and community organizations, to DHS employees, to parent groups and to anyone else who is interested in joining the conversation and ending domestic and sexual violence. Topics covered include teen dating violence, media influence, types of abuse, healthy relationships, sexual assault, consent, warning signs of abuse, vicarious trauma, oppression, barriers to leaving, and being a support person.

Many thanks to Spirit Mountain Community Fund and Verizon Foundation for funding our Education program in 2011/2012!

We currently offer all the following presentations and trainings. Click to download full descriptions of each option.

Addressing Domestic Violence as a Community
School-based Presentations: Healthy Relationships for Teens
Healthier Relationships for Your Teen
Domestic Violence Hurts All of Us: Make Your Workplace a Safe Place
The Importance of Screening for Domestic Violence in the Medical Community
In Her Shoes
Anti-Oppression
Effects of Oppression and Interpersonal Violence on the LGBTQ Community
Customize Your Own Presentation

If you’re interested in scheduling a presentation, please contact Nick at (503) 222.6507 x123 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Our Programs and Services

We believe that everyone deserves to live a life free from violence. The mission of Raphael House is to engage our entire community in non-violent living through advocacy, education, and community outreach, and by providing a safe haven from domestic violence.

We are a multi-faceted domestic violence prevention/intervention agency dedicated to fighting the causes and effects of intimate partner violence in a variety of ways. Founded in 1977, Raphael House operates the largest emergency domestic violence shelter in Multnomah County. We provide safety in a confidential location for a diverse community of women, men and children escaping domestic violence, and offer support on a 24-hour access line. Raphael House also provides rental assistance, financial empowerment, and case management through our Home in Hand/Hogar en Mano Housing Program and Advocacy Center.

Each year 130 adults and children are served in our emergency shelter, more than 1,200 callers utilize our access line, and an additional 480 survivors receive on-going support via our Advocacy Center.

In addition to serving a diverse community of women and children escaping domestic violence, Raphael House also works to eliminate the causes of family and intimate partner violence through community education and outreach.

Emergency Shelter

Raphael House’s emergency shelter serves families fleeing domestic violence. Our shelter is in a confidential location for safety and has eleven rooms: nine for families of up to five people and two for individual adults. This comprises more than half of the total bed space for victims of domestic violence in Multnomah County.

Every survivor entering Raphael House is offered individualized safety planning and advocacy. Many families enter our shelter with substantial barriers to building violence-free lives for themselves, and navigating the complex social service system is often challenging and limiting. We work tirelessly to help survivors surmount their barriers and achieve housing, employment, self-sufficiency, and safety.

All our advocacy services and many of our group activities are offered in both English and Spanish. Spanish-language advocacy is available seven days a week from 8am – 8pm. In the case of other language needs, Raphael House of Portland accesses interpretation services through a language bank. Every family living at Raphael House is provided with basic necessities such as food, clothing, household supplies and toiletries. In addition to advocacy, round-the-clock support, and basic needs, our participants are offered regular self-care and life-skills programming. 

Advocacy Center

Raphael House’s newest program! The Advocacy Center is designed to allow us to maintain and build our relationships with program participants who have moved out of our shelter. During their stay at Raphael House, women work with our advocates to create a set of individualized goals designed to help them on their journey to permanent housing, employment, and self sufficiency. In the Advocacy Center, these women can continue working with advocates as they work towards meeting goals necessary to stabilize and grow in their new homes.

In the Advocacy Center, we provide space for our program participants to participate in support groups and other activities such as youth programming, self care classes, and meetings with community partners. Participants can access computer and phone workstations, staff support and advocacy, and an emergency food pantry and clothing closet. In addition, the Advocacy Center is designed to empower women to initiate and lead their own programs, and to receive mentoring if they’re interested in learning to lead their own support groups.

Youth Program

More than 60% of the residents at Raphael House are children. Our Youth Program is designed to meet the unique needs of children, ages 0-17, who have experienced domestic violence.

Our Youth Program staff provide individualized safety planning and support to every child over the age of 4, helping them process their experiences and develop skills that will help them navigate the world in healthy ways. Both staff and volunteers also offer age-appropriate support groups, homework help, creative activities, monthly cultural focuses, and other programming specific to children’s’ needs and interests.

Home in Hand/Hogar en Mano Housing Program

Our Home in Hand/Hogar en Mano Housing Program provides on-going assistance to women and families after they move out of our emergency shelter. Along with rental assistance, our housing program provides case management and advocacy, helping participants navigate the complex social service system on their journey toward self-sufficiency. In 2008, 100% of the families exiting the Transitional Housing Program were successful in finding and maintaining permanent housing for at least 6 months. Our transitional program currently serves fourteen families.

Education and Outreach

The Education Program at Raphael House works to enact social change and prevent domestic violence by engaging our entire community in conversation and by encouraging people of all genders, ages and backgrounds to speak out against violence.

The primary activity of the Education Program is offering free prevention workshops throughout our community. We present in local middle and high schools, to healthcare providers, business leaders and community organizations, to DHS employees, to parent groups, and to anyone else who is interested in joining the conversation and ending domestic and sexual violence. Topics covered include teen dating violence, media influence, types of abuse, healthy relationships, sexual assault, consent, warning signs of abuse, vicarious trauma, oppression, barriers to leaving, and being a support person.

Since 2006, Raphael House’s Education Program has facilitated more than 600 presentations with more than 15,000 community members, and we work on both local and statewide policy to promote health and safety on every level of our community.

If you’re interested in scheduling a presentation or training, please contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Technology Safety

Internet and Computer Safety

If you are in danger, please try to use a safer computer that your abuser cannot access directly or remotely (by hacking). Safer computers include those at public libraries, Community Technology Centers, coffee shops and other public locations.

If you are in immediate danger, please:

  • Call 911,
  • Call our crisis line at (503) 222-6222, or
  • Call the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or TTY at 1-800-787-3224.

* If you think your activities are being monitored, they probably are. Use a safer public computer to access resources and information about domestic violence.

* It’s never possible to delete or clear all the evidence of your computer or online activities. Using the internet always leaves a trail that can be followed by someone with the tools to follow it. If you are being monitored, it may be dangerous to suddenly change computer behaviors by deleting your entire internet browsing history if that isn’t your regular habit. Instead, try deleting only the specific history items you want to keep private.

* If you are being monitored, email and instant messaging (IM) are not safe or confidential ways to talk to someone about domestic violence. It is always safer to call a hotline than to seek resources through email. If you do use email or IM, please use a safer computer and email from an internet-based email account (such as Gmail or Hotmail) that your abuser does not know about.

For more information we recommend the article Stalking in the Age of Technology by Vice President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. and Mary Lou Leary, Executive Director of the National Center for Victims of Crime.

Local and National Resources

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Comprehensive list of fact sheets on a wide variety of domestic violence-related topics, utilizing both national and state-based statistics.

Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence
Access resources throughout Oregon and learn how you can get involved in the movement to end violence in our community.

Love is Respect: National Teen Dating Abuse Hotline
National source for news and resources on healthy relationships and teen dating violence, with access to hotlines and a live Peer Advocate chat service.

Oregon AIDS/STD Hotline
Phone and web-based hotline connecting Oregonians to a wide variety of community resources and medical services.

What is Domestic Violence?

What is domestic violence?

Domestic violence is a pattern of coercive tactics that can include physical, psychological, sexual, economic, and emotional abuse, perpetrated by one person against an intimate partner, with the goal of establishing and maintaining power and control.

Domestic violence is a crime, and it occurs every 15 to 18 seconds in the United States. Seventy five percent of women who are murdered in this country are murdered by an intimate partner.

How does domestic violence affect children?

Children are just as vulnerable to domestic violence as parents are. Our experience working with thousands of children suggests that they are emotionally affected by abusive behavior in the home, and are also frequently at risk of physical harm. Witnessing domestic violence often results in sleeplessness, poor concentration, inability to perform in school, and emotional and mental health problems, amongst other problems.

Children in homes where violence occurs are 1,500 times more likely to be seriously abused or neglected than the rate for the general population.

How do we end domestic violence?

Ending domestic violence begins with a commitment to stopping abuse in your life and the lives of people around you. Support domestic violence programs, be an advocate for survivors, educate yourself about the effects of domestic violence, and report abuse when you see it - together, we can end domestic violence for good.

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